Looking for an Eco-friendly Rakhi?

eco friendly rakhis

Rakshabandhan is round the corner and we’re sure that has you out hunting for the perfect rakhi. While you are busy scouting for it, here are some environment friendly rakhi options you could explore.  

  1. Shunya Alternatives:
    Image Courtesy: https://shunyaalternatives.com/

    Image Courtesy: https://shunyaalternatives.com/

    Image Courtesy: https://shunyaalternatives.com/

    Image Courtesy: https://shunyaalternatives.com/

    Their rakhis are not only environment friendly but sustainable too. Made from hand spun cotton yarn, wooden beads, and seeds, these rakhis are sourced from specific communities to create opportunities. You could buy these eco friendly rakhis here.

  2. Bamboo rakhis by the tribals of Melghat:
    Image Courtesy: www.idiort.com

    Image Courtesy: www.idiort.com

    Image Courtesy: www.idiort.com

    Image Courtesy: www.idiort.com

    Made by the tribal people living in the area of Melghat in Maharashtra, these rakhis are not only biodegradable but also support the livelihood of the women making these. Rakhis bought pay for their meals. You can buy online rakhis here.

  3. Act Green India:
    Image Courtesy: Act Green India facebook page

    Image Courtesy: Act Green India facebook page

    11831674_882258388478245_8419600966113924984_n

    Advertisement

    Their eco friendly rakhis are made by rural women, using up-cycled materials. You can order their rakhis here. Alternatively, their rakhis are also available at Green the Map store (online portal).

  4. DIY: If you’d rather enjoy eco friendly rakhi making, you can find some ideas here, OR, try our DIY provided below.

    Image Courtesy: http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2015/03/easy-paper-flowers/

    Image Courtesy: http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2015/03/easy-paper-flowers/

Supplies Method
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Paper (you could use old paper, wedding cards)
  • Moli or Kalawa (the red thread from poojas) or Janeu thread (the one used in thread ceremonies)
  • Clay or Roti Dough
  • Rice grains,
  • Beetel nuts or Rudraksh
  • Cut the moli/kalawa to your desired length (long enough to be knotted when tied around the wrist). If using the janeu thread then you could colour it with haldi or kumkum or even beetroot (just squeeze some juice from it) by dipping it in water mixed with haldi/kumkum or directly in the juice, in case of beetroot. Tie a knot at both ends of the thread.
  • Cut the coloured paper into circles of descending sizes. Crumple these circles lightly by hand (refer image). Stick them onto each other to form a floral pattern and then stick them onto the center of the thread.
  • Stick a small-flattened piece of coloured clay/ roti dough at the center of the flower. Take some grains from your kitchen – like rice, and colour them in haldi and stick a few of them on the clay. Add a small piece of Beetel nut/ Rudraksha for making it look earthier.
  • Alternatively, if you have some old wooden beads lying around, you could put that to use and stick those at the center of the flower instead.

Share your views

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *